F_mbjzUCnrjkXsrs461D32YJD9CGWQoWwptvxTREeMo MIVACRON (mivacurium chloride)
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MIVACRON® (mivacurium chloride) INJECTION IS THE ONLY SHORT-ACTING NONDEPOLARIZING NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKADE AVAILABLE1,2

In adults, you may expect 15-20 minutes of neuromuscular blockade with MIVACRON¹*

*Range in clinical trials with 0.15 mg/kg dose: 9-38 minutes¹

The clinically effective duration for MIVACRON is one-third to one-half that of intermediate-acting agents¹

Time to spontaneous 25% recovery following the initial dose of MIVACRON¹a,b

timing chart

aDoses administered over 5–15 seconds

bClinically effective duration of neuromuscular block

cValues shown are medians of means from individual studies (range of individual patient values)

dRange in clinical trails:

9-38 mins at 0.15 mg/kg

10-36 mins at 0.2 mg/kg

14-38 mins at 0.25 mg/kg

Summary of the pharmacodynamics of doses of MIVACRON ≥ED95; administered over 5-15 seconds during opioid/nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia: The mean time for spontaneous recovery of the twitch response from 25%-75% of control amplitude is about 6 minutes (range: 3 to 9 minutes, n=32) following an initial dose of 0.15 mg/kg MIVACRON and 7-8 minutes (range: 4 to 24 minutes, n=85) following initial doses of 0.2 or 0.25 mg/kg MIVACRON.¹

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MIVACRON

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Safety Considerations1

MIVACRON is metabolized by plasma cholinesterase and should be used with great caution, if at all, in patients suspected of being homozygous for the atypical plasma cholinesterase gene due to the possibility of prolonged neuromuscular block. Plasma cholinesterase activity may be diminished in patients with genetic abnormalities of plasma cholinesterase, pregnancy, liver or kidney disease, malignant tumors, infections, burns, anemia, decompensated heart disease, peptic ulcer, or myxedema. The neuromuscular blocking effect of MIVACRON may be enhanced by drugs that reduce plasma cholinesterase activity (e.g., chronically administered oral contraceptives, glucocorticoids, or certain monoamine oxidase inhibitors) or by drugs that irreversibly inhibit plasma cholinesterase.